Category

Exclusion
Life as a Farmer by See Change Ambassador, Patrick Hipwell During November we are focusing on men’s voices as they speak openly about their mental health. We often have a certain view and expectation of what it means to be a man. This month we want to show the many different types of men there...
Read More
  Big Boys Don’t Cry by See Change Ambassador, Adrian Yeates   Big boys don’t cry  You can’t be a man with a tear in your eye.  Big boys always win  Anything less should feel like a sin.    Big boys are tall and strong  They’re always right and never wrong.    Big boys are...
Read More
Look at me and what do you see? by See Change Ambassador, Keith Dore   Look at me and what do you see?   Listen to me and what do you hear?  A 6’5”, 110kg strong Irishman. A Firefighter.  If you really saw me for who I am and really listened to my truth, you may never...
Read More
Black History Month by See Change Ambassador, Blessing Dada   The theme for this year’s Mental Health Week is “Mental Health in an Unequal World.” Thoughts that first come to mind when you read I read these: While the terms equity and equality may sound similar, the implementation of one versus the other can lead...
Read More
Six Tips on Campaigning for Social Change  by See Change Ambassador, Shari McDaid   What would it take to change Irish society so that everyone who had a mental health diagnosis could feel confident that they could pursue their dreams without fear of discrimination? How can you and I make a difference towards this vision? ...
Read More
Understanding Exclusion by See Change Ambassador, Sonia Moloney   As I sit down to write this, I feel a sense of discomfort. Because while I can say exclusion happens less and less, it still happens.   I’ve been through feeling excluded and, to be honest, it is one of the worst things you can go through. Exclusion in my...
Read More
Understanding Exclusion by See Change Ambassador, Blessing Dada   What is exclusion and what does it mean to me? People (in general) with mental illness(s) have a high risk of living socially excluded from the mainstream society. In most developed countries, substantial disparities exist in access to mental health services for black and minority ethnic...
Read More
See Change
Accessibility
X

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Privacy Statement

Close